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Learn how Supervolcanoes caused the World’s Largest Landslide in Wyoming

Myron Cook
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We will follow in the footsteps of geologists and learn how they uncovered and solved the great mystery of the Heart Mountain mega landslide near Cody, Wyoming. Their search for answers led them into Yellowstone National Park and adjacent areas where they determined that giant volcanoes and their earthquakes had triggered the world’s largest landslide.

Yellowstone volcano, Yellowstone Landslide, Wyoming geology, Heart Mountain Landslide, Heart Mountain detachment, Bighorn Basin Geology, Geology Absaroka Mountains, Natural Catastrophe, Homeschool Earth Science Education

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Feb 3, 2022

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Comments 199
EasternPainter PG
This was a wonderful lesson. I used to do soils as an inspector for septic systems, and I had thought at the time that I should have been a geologist. It is wonderful to see the land and what it is composed of.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you.
Bobby Adkins
Bobby Adkins Month ago
Outstanding video, stunning visuals, this is the first time I’m hearing of a mega slide in Wyoming, I had saw videos of 3 mega slides in Utah of similar size, and slid under the same conditions, they actually deposited a multi inch think layer of obsidian at the contact layer due to the melting of the volcanic material , I love these long form in depth explanations of geology
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I'm glad you liked the video. Tune in...I'll be releasing more.
Sutton Cook
Sutton Cook 5 months ago
Love the video! I’m glad I know now, I always thought of heart mountain as the top of a volcano flying through the air and landing in its current spot. This information makes much more sense.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 5 months ago
It is an amazing story.
Tom Ivan Kortkamp
I saw huge blocks with slanted layers just like the ones in your video, when traveling west of Thermopolis (where our family lived), to the Yellowstone region. I often wondered how they were formed. Thanks to your video, I now understand. Also thanks for the addendum to your video, which was very helpful.
Backcountry Renegade
This is an amazing presentation. Thank you for this work. I visited heart mountain and saw this slide but love the detail you presented. I was a geology student and love seeing this. Looking forward to more content
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you very much!
Avana Vana
Avana Vana Month ago
Besides the Heart Mountain landslide, I recommend reading up on the recently-discovered Markagunt and Sevier gravity slides in Utah…they about the same size as Heart Mountain (~2000 sq mi displaced terrain). The Markagunt and Sevier gravity slides are thought to be related to inflation of calderas in the region during the Mid-Tertiary ignimbrite flare-up. Really interesting structural geology and fascinating pseudotachylites. This is a great video-your work is really appreciated! Question: does the detachment actually make a sharp angle (as drawn in the video) between it and the heardscarp of the slide, or is it actually more of a listric, curved scarp?
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I'll bet you are right. It sounds like you are into these systems...very interesting!
Avana Vana
Avana Vana Month ago
@Myron Cook Thank you for confirming that detail on the geometry of the breakaway fault. Regarding the Utah gravity slides-IMO, one lesson to be learned there is just how long the geology was passed over as just “weird rocks” or “volcanics”. Given the sheer size of these kinds of events, field identification can be difficult. Now that there is more consciousness of these kinds of enormous gravity slides in the literature, I expect we might find that such events are more common in regions with a history of silicic caldera volcanism/ignimbrite flare-ups, than previously appreciated. For example: I expect such gravity slides might also come to be found in the Bolivian Altiplano, associated with its Pliocene ignimbrite flare-up, in the Sierra Madre Occidental of Mexico, and perhaps even in older ignimbrite complexes/silicic large igneous provinces such as Chon Aike in Patagonia. It seems that the combination of rapid accumulation of thick volcanic sequences with the kind of regional uplift and oversteepening and destabilization associated with caldera resurgence could be a recipe for this sort of disaster.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you for your feedback! I have read a paper and saw a youtube video on those giant Utah slides...impressive. The breakaway fault for the Heart Mtn slide does have the sharp angle. I'm not aware of anyone describing it as listric.
Sally Vedder
Sally Vedder Month ago
Kudos to you!!! Your wonderful style of presentation gives us the Real Hands/Feets-ON process of discovery!! Very well done--incredible geologic story & amazing how much of it is STILL VISIBLE to those of us Rock-Nerds persistent enough to get out there & find it!! Thank you so much for sharing with us, in such a successful way!!!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you very much!
TheAldini10
TheAldini10 Month ago
This is amazing. A wealth of information. I absolutely love everything about this video! Thank you for all the effort you put into this presentation. Best part, you don't take a whole 5 minutes talking about your sponsor or your Patreon supporters, or "hit like, subscribe and that bell". That kind of thing is a cancer on the Internet, so seeing a knowledge rich video like this with none of that BS is such a breath of fresh air.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I'm glad you enjoyed it!
WRP
WRP Month ago
Thanks for your efforts and well done. As a kid growing up in New England I had a very hard time getting a grasp on the local geology due to its complexity from multiple orogenies and glaciatians. Now I know Wyoming is the place to see it all.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad to help
Vivian Winford
Vivian Winford Month ago
Thank you for your video of Wyoming history. Seeing all the different colors of dirt/rocks you can tell there was a lot of upheaval of the ground. Having traveled the route from Gillette to Casper many times (Dr. Appts.) you can see many interesting land formations along the way there also. Beautiful state Wyoming, so diverse.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Jack Pearson
Jack Pearson Month ago
As an instructor of 30+ years, first of all...nice job! I moved to Wyoming 6 weeks ago. I'm still in the jaw-dropping awe, of mother nature phase. I clearly see the forces at work as I explore the areas and try to imagine just how it could have happened. last week I drove down to the Flaming Gorge area, some geological loop in the Sheep Creek section. You have given me a great amount of knowledge and insight. Most of all, look at the detail....but step back and look for the scale of the area.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you for the feedback. Especially from an instructor!
lmcwill0502
lmcwill0502 Month ago
I am so happy ,I came upon you, thank you for sharing your expertise in geology/ geography. I am a big map lover and love all of Earth's terrains all over the world. Excited to learn more about the beauty we have on earth and what I see. You give us the history and beginnings of that beautiful mountain .
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thanks and welcome
Felipe Ricketts
Felipe Ricketts Month ago
Thanks for sharing this amazing story! It boggles the mind to think of what it might have been like when the 20x30 mile area slid away at 200 mph or so! This earth we live on is a dynamic place!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 29 days ago
My thoughts exactly
Bill Trent
Bill Trent Month ago
Mr. Cook, Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and enthusiasm with me. It is a wonderful presentation. I'm glad to know there is a teachers like you, and proud to say I attended your class today... Thanks, again
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
So nice of you
JMBtimes3
JMBtimes3 Month ago
Absolutely love the content. You are the Bob Ross of geology. I felt alittle confused at first. But with you diagrams it all made perfect sense towards the end. I found especially fascinating the part about the heat being generated during the slide, essentially lubricating the plane.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Awesome, thank you!
Sonja Petersen
Sonja Petersen 6 months ago
I really enjoyed this presentation and learned a whole lot! You are a good teacher.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 6 months ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Saima Leon
Saima Leon Month ago
You are what I’ve dreamed of as I’ve traveled in the West. A geologist tour guide to explain all the amazing features as I drive along. I’ll settle for the videos.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I'm so glad you enjoy them.
Ahmad M
Ahmad M 4 months ago
Keep going Sir...., this is what type of geological video that I want and always looking for
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 4 months ago
Thank you for the feedback.
John Moellmer
John Moellmer Month ago
What a delightful presentation. A few years ago, I stumbled upon the original paper presenting the CO2 pillow concept and was amazed at the speed, distance, and 2° angle. You have a gift in the way you present the delight of the discovery and the beauty of the earth. Thank you for using your time to give to others.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad it was helpful!
Deebee Nonya
Deebee Nonya Month ago
All I can say is Wow! What an informative and interesting presentation. Thank you so much for sharing your passion and knowledge!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
When older rock lies on top of younger rock 2 processes can explain it. 1) Landslides of older rock bury areas of younger rock. Mount Saint Helen's massive landslide in 1980 is a good example of that. 2) Asteroid impacts cause older rock to bury younger rock along the crater rim. Meteor Crater is a good example of this.
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
The same hot spot under Yellowstone was under SW Washington, NE Oregon, and Western Idaho. Millions of years ago, fissures appeared and released Flood Basalt that traveled all the way to Columbia River. It buried parts of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho. I live in Central Washington. Numerous layers of Flood Basalt are over 1 mile thick. In some places it is over 2 miles thick. The Yakima River Canyon is great place to see many layers in plain view.
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
@TheErik249 I'm a big fan of Nick, he always amazes.
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
@TheErik249 Thanks, I live in Yakima and they drilled here too. Not sure how thick, but based on gaps carved by Yakima River in the ridges, see lots of Basalt. We only see the top several thousand feet.
TheErik249
TheErik249 Month ago
The deepest part of the Columbia river basalt formation is at Prosser. Its 3 miles thick at that geographic point. Shell, EXXON-MOBIL, and BP, performed exploratory drilling in several spots throughout eastern Washington. There is a sizable crude oil deposit under eastern Washington. I certainly hope that you have viewed Nick Zentners documentary on the Columbia river basalt formation. Thank you for mentioning this.
Sukivision
Sukivision Month ago
Only about half way though the video, and I love how informative you are. As it might be boring to others. It is very captivating to me. The one love i never got in to completely was geology. Yes in simple terms rocks are boring. I know as an armature geologist, rocks tell a story. As you have already mentioned several time in this video. Hope to see more when you find time to!
Sukivision
Sukivision Month ago
@Myron Cook I can see the passion you have for rocks. Figuring out where they came from, and what happened to them in the past. Some times the best stories come from the simplest boring things. Specially if you love what you do.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Wow, thank you!
Dean B
Dean B Month ago
Really appreciate the time and effort you have put in to this. Really enjoyed it!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Barb W
Barb W Month ago
I wondered about the geology of our area, thank you for explaining it so concisely. I understand it so much better now.
Barb W
Barb W Month ago
@Myron Cook As an artist do you find that knowing the geology helps you in your painting? And do you have paintings on display in the area?
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad it was helpful!
jmcqk6
jmcqk6 Month ago
This is fricken fantastic! Thank you so much for putting this video together. I really appreciate being able to actually see the full story.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Naoaki Ooishi
Naoaki Ooishi Month ago
Amazing and fantastic video! Thanks for very well explained and easily understandable contents.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Bill Child
Bill Child Month ago
You're love of art and geology go together nicely and I can picture the amazing forces and magnitude of it all..Some quick animation might help too for those not as imaginative as you or I..
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you for your feedback!
fightingtwozeroone
fightingtwozeroone 5 months ago
Hi Myron!!! (This is Lowell). This is an awesome video, I am very excited to see you sharing your great depth of geologic knowledge. I subscribed to your channel and am very much looking forward to future content!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 5 months ago
Thank you Lowell
ScottJLake1
ScottJLake1 Month ago
What a well thought out presentation. I am a geology hobbiest. I got lost at times, but you brought me back in. Thank you for this.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Martin Audet
Martin Audet Month ago
Absolutely fascinating!. I love the geology of the American Northwest. Thank you for a wonderful presentation.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Many thanks!
Robert Waits
Robert Waits 2 months ago
Well, Myron. That was awesome. Thank you for all your work and time to share your knowledge. I am from Lander.(the Bear Guy) and i really love Geology. Thanks again!!!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
I am glad you enjoyed it!
Mark Morley
Mark Morley Month ago
I love the way you explained all of this. Thank you.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad it was helpful!
LR Wright
LR Wright Month ago
Coulld the blocks have slid along a steeper incline, say due to volcanic uplift making the slope steeper which then later deflated causing the detachment zone to sink to the now 2 degree slope? Also could it have continued over some time rather than all at once? I like the hydroplaning idea. It's just really hard to wrap my mind around that scale of event, especially when the area looks so different. Thanks for putting this together!!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I like the way you think. Indeed, geologists did consider the idea that it occurred over a long time. However, all the data point to a catastrophic detachment. I am not aware of any evidence that the slope was once much steeper and I haven't seen any evidence for it in the field.
JMBtimes3
JMBtimes3 Month ago
I would love to see more content about the older volcanos in the area.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I may delve into that subject in the future. There is an infinite amount of material I can cover in this region and nearby!
Moses Supposes
Moses Supposes 2 months ago
I was born and raised in Powell, and to this day I still don’t know if it’s spelled Hart or Heart Mountain 😂 I’ve seen it spelled both ways forever. What an awesome video! Thank you!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
Thank you
atcawsome
atcawsome Month ago
I live outside of cody and when I drove by heart mountain a couple of days ago near powell. It seemed that the mountain had a large rock slide like at one point. I guess I was right but I didn't know it was that big! Scary stuff.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Indeed!
Dylan Ashley
Dylan Ashley Month ago
Thanks for sharing, I’m a native to Wyoming and this is fantastically intriguing
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
NightShade1161
NightShade1161 Month ago
I am your 220th subscriber! And I cannot wait to hear more from you!! I love your channel I love your content I love how excited you are about it!!. I am happy to be a part of your community as I know it will grow!!. Thank you for having me. Keep up the awesome job!.
NightShade1161
NightShade1161 Month ago
@Myron Cook no really thank you! Not many people are as excited about geology or on geological formation as you, I find it inspiring, I’m not a geologist myself but i loved it!..i have truly consider taking some of the basic courses! I’m afraid I’m not smart enough lol!…I love geological formation, tectonics etc. etc. I honestly find it utterly fascinating!…so I at least some day hope to be able to go with a geologist to learn in the field!….. so thank you again!….
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you so much!!
Sir Ridesalot
Sir Ridesalot Month ago
A truly fascinating and mind boggling event. A CGI presentation of the slide as it occurred would be fantastic too but I bet it'd be expensive to create. Thank you so much for taking the time and energy to explain this event.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Patrick Redmond
Patrick Redmond Month ago
Fantastic explanation. As one who works on landslides as a geologist and engineer it brings up so many questions which I feel compelled to investigate further. Vibration has to have played a part to initiate the movement to begin with as a retrogressive slide. However what could it have been in that tiny layer of the dolomite that was uniform enough over such a large area that the initial break stayed in a layer in a rock that one would normally be almost impossible to break. Evaporites maybe? Geology is fascinating. Thank you for this
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Yes, extreme vibrations must have played a role to start it up. There is no evidence of anything anomalous along the bedding plane that it broke free on; there are easily 100 bedding planes up through the dolomite that are very similar.
Eric Owen
Eric Owen Month ago
Hi Myron, I have wanted someone to go through the Heart Mountain story with me because my geology professor dad designed a "Heart Mountain" t-shirt and I have only turned toward geology only after he had already passed away. Would love to send you a photo of his "Litho-ski Wyoming" t-shirt.
Eric Owen
Eric Owen Month ago
@Myron Cook I just messaged you on FB at your Bighorn Group. Tried to add a photo here of the shirt. I couldn't figure it out...lol! Sorry!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I would like to see that. PM me
Clifford Gallegos
Living in Wyo, and seeing Heart Mt then learning about it, this story is far more interesting than Devils tower, yet is almost unknown to even locals.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I agree!
Bill McCrackin
Bill McCrackin Month ago
I’m a geologist and visited this area during field camp. Great presentation!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you!
PrincessTS01
PrincessTS01 2 months ago
50 million years ago Siletzia was barely docking to NA according to all the Geology videos I've seen from Nick Zenter in the crazy Eocene episodes from early this year and last year. So the Yellowstone hot spot was nowhere near where it is now, following the snake river plane, as it has been moving eastward since. One thing to note is the craton that is north America thickens the farther east one goes to the great plains and basin of miss, this suggests that stuff on the edge of the mass has a greater chance of volcanization.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
Indeed, the last major eruption at Yellowstone is only about 500,000 years old. The Absaroka volcanism is much older and the two volcanic provinces overlap some in their locations.
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
I live in Washington State... we had largest recorded landslide in human history when Mt Saint Helen's erupted in 1980. Entire north side came loose and slid miles before stopping. Spirit Lake had over 1,000 feet of landslide debris bury it. Looking at it from the air, one can start grasping at the scale of destruction. I climbed the north face in 1971. I have photos of us on an extremely steep and icy slope. That slope is now scattered over 200 square miles after landslide and lateral eruption.
Steven Rohrich
Steven Rohrich Month ago
@Daniel Taylor Thanks... wow that was hundreds of miles away. I was about 50 miles, felt the earthquake, then explosion. Took about 1 or 2 hours, then the ash fell.
Daniel Taylor
Daniel Taylor Month ago
When Mt. Saint Helen's erupted, I was getting ready to open my roller rink and suddenly the roof started rattling, in Victoria, B.C.
Old shep
Old shep Month ago
Thank you. the way you explained to us laymen is a blessing.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
It's my pleasure
Western Spirit
Western Spirit Month ago
Given the very shallow angle of the slide, can we assume that water was involved as a lubricant for the massive amount of material detached from the lower layer?
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Over-pressured fluids were definitely involved. Created low friction environment.
Tanga Toto
Tanga Toto Month ago
In my next life 🤓, I want to be a geologist! No day would ever be boring . Thank you for opening a window into our fascinating world.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Lawney Malbrough
So how much force does it take to push that much rock sixty miles? Continue researching sir. You still have something to learn.
PrincessTS01
PrincessTS01 2 months ago
the description of how this moves reminds me of a scene in a movie from chevy chase Christmas vacation where he has a metal round sled he adds wax to that causes extreme motion
Chris Blain
Chris Blain Month ago
Great lesson. I love your narration style.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you liked it!
Peggie in Colfax, CA
Excellent presentation! Lets hear more! Many thanks. (I'm not a geologist)
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thanks, will do!
祉佑 陳
祉佑 陳 5 months ago
Thank you for teaching me you are a good teacher.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 5 months ago
Thank you
StereoSpace
StereoSpace 28 days ago
Great video, I thoroughly enjoyed that. Thank you.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 28 days ago
Glad you enjoyed it
Daniel Animal
Daniel Animal Month ago
Great video, thank you!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
My pleasure!
Dyanne Johnson
Dyanne Johnson Month ago
Oh my goodness…your at the place of glory up that small canyon….I cut my teeth on the bush in northern BC…I absolutely am awestruck with this beauty..I actually had a large intake of breath….
Mike
Mike Month ago
I used to agree with you but after studying the 1980 irruption of Mount Saint Helens and the striations that were laid down in just a few months , some in just hours with the exact same colors and types of rock I am not convinced anymore that your chart is accurately giving us the dates .I would suggest you go to Mount Saint helens and study the striation plus the fact that at the bottom of what was the lake their diveres hey have found that the wood from the trees at the bottom of the lake have already turned to coal .There are many questions that need answers and we must not sweep under the rug because our careers were built on a lie ,or let’s just say a paradigm that was wrong .I personally believe the earth is millions of years old but some of the things that we are saying we have no way of knowing because of the circular logic used in dating these rocks dating rocks by fossils and fossils by rocks is circular .there are too many mistakes like this that are so obvious I have not just students but Lay people Who can show you these discrepancies when this information was first given to all of us about 100 years ago ,it made sense but now that we can see a little clearer we know that the dating system is highly suspect. Just repeating what grandpa believed doesn’t make it so true science goes where the evidence leads no matter how uncomfortable it makes us.
Isa Sala
Isa Sala Month ago
Awesome. Physical geographer from Spain thanks you for this video 👍🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it!
Jesse Paraguya
Jesse Paraguya Month ago
Thanks for sharing your expertise.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad it was helpful!
Ronald Montgomery
I like it, all well and good , yes the land moved, butt what was the cause of all of this land movement? If you tell me it was caused when the Earth captured its sister planet know as the moon and its orbit then was much closer, you will have my full attention. The action on the Earth is much like title force. I can't believe the story of a small planet crashing into Earth and creating the moon. There is a lot more to this story.
Richard Fullmer
Richard Fullmer Month ago
Myron I enjoyed the information very much, I learned a lot, I look forward to more
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Glad you enjoyed it
Dan Hartigan
Dan Hartigan 2 months ago
You sir are very underated, I wish you best with your videos
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
I appreciate that!
Tina Lavel
Tina Lavel Month ago
I love his way of teaching fantastic
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you!
Teem B
Teem B Month ago
Can see Heart Mountain every morning and drive pst it every day.
Dyanne Johnson
Dyanne Johnson Month ago
Boy do I miss the Elk call from Northern BC….I’m very much enjoying your teaching skills
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Awesome! Thank you!
David Williams
David Williams Month ago
Yellowstone is at least 4 million years old with half million year eruptions
Les Woodburn
Les Woodburn Month ago
A massive,massive thumbs up! Thanks.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thanks for the visit
Crispy
Crispy Month ago
What caused a change in gravity to allow such tall volcanoes???
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Strata volcanoes and composite volcanoes can be up to 16,000ft from top to base (see Kilimanjaro). You then add how high the base of the volcano was above the basin floor to get how high the peaks were above the basin floor as I mentioned in the video.
Erwin Winarno
Erwin Winarno Month ago
Amazing presentation👍👍
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thanks a lot
Elaine Flores
Elaine Flores 6 months ago
This is so interesting you do a great job loved it
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 6 months ago
Glad you enjoyed it
Bill Child
Bill Child Month ago
Really fascinating story..
c hurlburt
c hurlburt Month ago
Please give us a good view of your stratigraphic column so that we can study it. Thx.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I will do that in one of my next videos. I'm glad you are interested in it. If you send me a note later this summer I could send you a file with the updated version.
Patrick Redmond
Patrick Redmond Month ago
Where did you get the stratigraphic section display. Thanks
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
I made the column. If you would like a digital copy pm me and I'll send it to you.
Hal Weilbrenner
Hal Weilbrenner Month ago
One look at that thing & it looks like it blew it's top like St. Helens (explosion & collapse).
rdubyah 55
rdubyah 55 2 months ago
new zealand here.excellent video,we don't have those time scales here.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
Thanks for watching!
Melanie Hefner
Melanie Hefner Month ago
Absolutely fascinating.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you!
overtoke
overtoke Month ago
how long did this landslide take?
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Most of the slide was finished in about 30 minutes.
Wyo Dino
Wyo Dino Month ago
Cool Channel Myron! Happily subbed.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thank you for watching
Grandma Kelly’s Clean Life, Clean Living
Very interesting ❤️👵💕🌺
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
Thanks for visiting
Western Spirit
Western Spirit Month ago
How does this compare to Storegga or the Hawaiian islands landslides in volume?
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
There are underwater landslides that are bigger. This is the largest subaerial landslide along with one in Utah that is essentially the same size.
Sue F
Sue F Month ago
Please how does this compare to Mt St Helens?
ScottJLake1
ScottJLake1 Month ago
This would be much more significant, also very different events.
David Dickinson
David Dickinson Month ago
Thank you
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
You're welcome
@geosciblog
@geosciblog 5 months ago
Wow. Just found your channel. I eagerly await more videos.
Carmen
Carmen Month ago
Fascinating
Helio Zuazua
Helio Zuazua Month ago
lovely
WildlifeObsessed
I know no one whose interest could span 90 + Mins
Randy Smith
Randy Smith Month ago
Can it not be trust faulting, that also slid?
Randy Smith
Randy Smith Month ago
@Myron Cook thanks for the reply, thats crazy!
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
For a period, geologists seriously considered thrust faulting but could not find the evidence for it.
Stephen Ellis
Stephen Ellis 2 months ago
Heart mountain looks like a face
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
Sure does!
Norton Lykin
Norton Lykin Month ago
Interesting but does not deliver on the headline.
Michelle Garry
Michelle Garry Month ago
Only 50 million years ago? Why not 50 trillion? Or 50 gazillion? Because the earth is approximately 6000 years old, that’s why. If it was millions of years old, it would have eroded down to mere dust. Common sense.
John Schmitt
John Schmitt Month ago
Yep. Eroded to dust, deposited on the seafloor, accreted to a continent, uplifted, eroded to dust, deposited on the seafloor.... rinse and repeat.
George Cormier
George Cormier Month ago
You sure have some imagination. (millions of years ago) haha
NeutroniummAlchemist
The problem here is that your imagination is broken. Thus, you cannot conceive the vast eons of time and dismiss them out of hand.
Sigi Soltau
Sigi Soltau Month ago
And your proof against that is?
ChrisNVegas
ChrisNVegas Month ago
Not sure if I can buy this. How does level land slide? Those layers were all quite level. I waited for an hour to see a slope and never saw one.
ChrisNVegas
ChrisNVegas Month ago
@Myron Cook I watched the whole video. I don't recall you talking about the slope. I even re-watched some segments. I still don't understand how a 2% slope is enough for a land slide. That must have been one hell of an earthquake.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook Month ago
It was on a 2 degree slope. If you watch the video carefully, you will learn how it happened. Think of a vibrating air hockey table.
Mike Peralta
Mike Peralta Month ago
Ask Jesus to save you.
Elder Omar Castellanos
LAMB OF GOD = JESUS CHRIST = YESHUA = SON OF GOD. REVELATION. 1 : 8. I AM AL'PHA AND O'ME-GA, THE BEGINNING AND THE ENDING, SAITH THE LORD, WHICH IS, AND WHICH WAS, AND WHICH IS TO COME, THE ALMIGHTY.
Andy Girone
Andy Girone 2 months ago
Wyoming isn't real
Sigi Soltau
Sigi Soltau Month ago
Funny. Obviously trolling. I'm not even in the United States and I know Wyoming is real.
Myron Cook
Myron Cook 2 months ago
😀
Jana Burritt
Jana Burritt Month ago
Prove the ages. Were you there. If I believe the Bible the Earth is only about 6,000 years old the genetics go back about 6,000 years to the originator you better do some research buddy I love you God bless you and keep
Sigi Soltau
Sigi Soltau Month ago
Well there's several dating methods people can use, each one is quite accurate. There's the potassium-argon dating and the radiometric dating. If you date a rock with either and the age of the rock is 3 billion years old, the error to either side would be a few thousand years. Just because one can't be somewhere when something happened millions of years ago, doesn't mean one can't piece together what happened. There's so many ways one could do that.